11 Effects Hyperemesis Gravidarum has on a Pregnant Body

During all of three my pregnancies, I suffered with hyperemesis gravidarum which I explained to others as “an extreme case of morning sickness” mostly because I wasn’t sure how else to explain it.

But hyperemesis gravidarum is NOT just an extreme case of morning sickness.

While it is characterized by nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, it is actually so much more than that.  The persistent vomiting results in dehydration and malnutrition which causes one problem after another.

If you really want to know what it’s like living with this cruel condition, here are an additional 11 effects hyperemesis gravidarum has on a pregnant body.

11 effects hyperemesis gravidarum has on a pregnant body
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**Furthermore, I am not a medical professional and nothing in this post should be taken as medical advice. I am simply a mother who has been there and lived to tell the tale.

11 effects hyperemesis gravidarum has on a pregnant body

1. Fainting Spells

Actual fainting spells and feeling faint are a very common complaint for pregnant women with HG.  Dehydration, low blood pressure and low blood sugar levels are all to blame.  Standing or even sitting upright for long amounts of time can be very difficult to do.

2. Muscle Atrophy

Women suffering from hyperemesis gravidarum spend most of their days lying in bed (when they’re not hanging headfirst over the toilet bowl).  With very little energy to spare and a steady stream of sleep-inducing medications, there’s not much else they can do.  This usually results in their muscles becoming weak and stiff.

3. Leg Cramps

I can honestly say that the pain of leg cramps while bedridden with hyperemesis gravidarum was the closest thing to labor pains I have ever experienced.  While many women experience leg cramps, HG or not, dehydration makes them 10 times more painful and harder to recover from (pretty sure I was limping to the toilet for a month).

4. Sore Throat

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This should be an obvious one to anyone who has ever thrown up before… Vomiting multiple times in a day results in a raw, sore throat that makes even speaking painful.  Considering that most of what comes up is bile,  the lining of the throat can be severely damaged and it’s not uncommon for women to have blood in their vomit both from tearing the throat and/or esophagus.

(TIP: A throat spray is a better option than lozenges when dealing with HG)

5. Acid Reflux

So we’ve established that everywhere from the mouth to the stomach (and vice versa) resembles a war zone.  This means of course that acid reflux will be the norm for the duration of the pregnancy.  This, again, is something many women without HG experience, but this time – it’s not just a common case of heartburn.  With torn tissues in the throat and esophagus – it can cause a constant burning sensation in the chest.  A prescription strength antacid may be necessary.

6. Diarrhea

And if you weren’t already dehydrated and spending most of your time in the bathroom already, then this ought to fix that.  You can expect this mess after receiving a round of IV fluids, taking a suppository or eating and drinking a little bit after a few days of not eating or drinking at all.  Basically your entire gastrointestinal system gets messed up thanks to hyperemesis gravidarum.

7. Tooth Decay

All of that acidic vomit does a real number on your tooth enamel.  And if you’re not getting the calcium and other nutrients you need for strong bones then you will notice it first in your teeth.  We tend to forget how important chewing actual food is to keep our teeth healthy and when you’re suffering from hyperemesis gravidarum there is very little chewing, biting or eating going on at all.

8. Hair Loss

We know about postpartum hair loss but did you know that you can also lose your hair if you’re extremely dehydrated and malnourished?  So many vitamins and minerals are important for the growth of healthy hair and when you’re not getting those, your body has to steal them from somewhere else.  So instead of boasting the luscious locks that many women claim to have during pregnancy – I was plucking handfuls of it off my pillowcase.

9. Dry Skin

Dehydration can do some pretty crazy things to your skin.  Not only does it get really dry and itchy, but it also loses a lot of it’s elasticity.  I remember nurses doing “the pinch test” on the back of my hand each time I went into the hospital and each time it stayed up longer and longer.

Testing for Dehydration
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10. Motion Sickness

If you’ve never experienced motion sickness before then prepare for the bumpy ride that is hyperemesis gravidarum.  The delicate state of the stomach just can’t handle being tossed and turned.  While anything and everything seemed to trigger nausea and vomiting anyway – moving around at all brought it on much faster.  I would get motion sickness if I walked too fast or moved my head too quickly or even when I turned over in bed.  Car rides were unbearable.  Even feeling the baby kick, which should be a joyous sensation, triggered the nausea and vomiting.

11. Depression

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This was perhaps the worst side effect of hyperemesis gravidarum for me.  The loneliness of the long days and nights I spent in bed – unable to even hold a conversation, left me feeling isolated and imprisoned.  I couldn’t care for my other children and had to depend entirely on others for help which was very difficult for a control freak like me to do.  I even needed help to shower.

The most depressing thought of all was that I had months and months of this ahead of me, unlike a bout of the stomach flu or food poisoning which tends to resolve itself in a matter of a few days.  Nothing I tried gave me any relief – no combination of prescription medications, IV fluids or hospitalization solved the problem.  I seriously regretted getting pregnant and briefly contemplated terminating the pregnancy in order for it to end.  Throughout my second pregnancy, I sought therapy for my depression in an effort to avoid postpartum depression (unfortunately, it didn’t work.)


Hyperemesis gravidarum and morning sickness are not the same.

A woman suffering from HG is unable to care for herself and will require much help and attention during her pregnancy.  And while there are a lot of home remedies and even pharmaceuticals available for nausea and vomiting – the only real cure for HG is giving birth.  

For more information and resources visit the Hyperemesis Education & Research Foundation at www.helpHER.org H.E.R. Foundation

Author: Vanessa Rapisarda

Stay at home mother of three, aspiring writer & parenting blogger